Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Shoot from the hip?!
#1
Is there a school in the Colorado Springs area that teaches pistol shooting without a conventional line of sight aim such as you might encounter in a confrontational situation where you absolutely have to get off the first shot?
Reply
#2
I feel that that is only learned through lots of practice and is only for very close range self defense. I can hit center of mass 95% of the time from 10' or less and only about 45% of the time from 20' or more. Sure is fun though, and when you hit what your aiming at, it looks cool.
Reply
#3
(02-27-2010, 12:21 PM)Suburban78 Wrote: I feel that that is only learned through lots of practice and is only for very close range self defense. I can hit center of mass 95% of the time from 10' or less and only about 45% of the time from 20' or more. Sure is fun though, and when you hit what your aiming at, it looks cool.

So, learn with a .22 and 100,000 rounds of ammo?
Reply
#4
Paradise Sales off of W. Colorado Ave does teach something along those lines as a small part of their basic handgun class. It's not exacly shoot from the hip, but they do teach to have your gun in the ready position at the hip in case you have to fire, but they teach to extend and fire in a point-and-shoot manner, without aiming. On range day we did something like 10 rounds like that....so not exactly what you're looking for but it's my $.02
Reply
#5
(02-27-2010, 09:02 PM)PikesPeakMtnMan Wrote: not exactly what you're looking for but it's my $.02

It sounds like the place to start! Thanks.
Reply
#6
http://www.precisiondefensivess.net/

I found this school:
Reply
#7
(02-28-2010, 05:18 AM)John B Wrote: http://www.precisiondefensivess.net/

I found this school:

That sounds like an interesting school....I gotta start saving my pennies
Reply
#8
I guess I don't understand. I spent about ten sessions at the range and went from lucky to hit the back stop to being able to put ten of ten, in three different targets, at different heights each reset, no more than two on a target at a time, and all in 5.5 seconds (Pact timer).

I AM NOT VERY GOOD, but it is not that hard.

I did - all - of my practice at 25 feet. If you can hit at 25 feet, from the hip, you can hit anything you may need to shoot at.

I watched some videos of Bill Jordan (retired [and now dead] border patrol officer) doing some demonstrations. He would shoot an aspirin tablet off a table - draw and fire from the hip. I watched that and said to myself "If he can do that, then I can learn to hit something about four times that size.", and I did.

Repeating I AM NOT VERY GOOD, but I firmly believe that shooting from the hip is a skill worth learning.
Reply
#9
"but I firmly believe that shooting from the hip is a skill worth learning. "
I second this. I also feel that learning to shoot one handed with arm extended is a good skill to practice.
Smileak
Reply
#10
Shooting from the hip is not hard, and if you start with a larger target (gallon milk jug - empty or full, your choice), you can get the hang of it quickly. Quick-draw is an entirely different skill, and one that should be practiced with an UNLOADED weapon in front of a mirror. When you can put the two skill sets together, it can be quick and impressive to those not in the know.

I second practicing firing with a single hand grip, and also weak side. Have fun - be safe!
Reply
#11
(02-28-2010, 05:18 AM)John B Wrote: http://www.precisiondefensivess.net/

I found this school:

JB. This school is one of the best schools I attended 4 total, it is cheep,and they train you for the real world defensive shooting.They teach shooting from the HIP and more. With their Level II you will shoot from different pos. from the ground.This simulates you falling down and they will put stress on you.so you will know what it is like in the real world. These guy's are great. I have taken all their classes. Check them out. ED # is 719-659-9858
Reply
#12
Although I have had a small amount of formal training in the past, I'm a firm believer in learning hands on for ones self.
I watch and read as much as I can stand when it comes to techniques, and then I get as much time as possible at the range to test things out for myself. After all, these days there's a ton of imformation to be had on the internet for self education. Not everything you're told, read or watch is going to be what works best for you. Which is a big part of why I don't like spending money on training from teaching facility's.
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)