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Building my first house
#1
I have never owned or built my own home before. I did get the experience of watching my parents build their first home when I was 16, so I know a few things to watch for and look for and that I have to stay on top of things.

I love Colorado and that will never change, but living in Denver and in the city itself has become an experience that I'm ready to see the end of. Between my car being stolen (was recovered undamaged thankfully), hit repeatedly by drunks and people with no integrity that cant leave a contact name, number and insurance info, drunks yelling and carrying on outside my window at 2 am for hours on end and all the god awful crazy traffic, I'm definitely ready to find a small piece of land, (maybe half an acre would be sufficient) to put a house on. I want a place to call mine, to spend the rest of my life in, a place to call home. Stability, security, and comfort. Wont have to pay $120 a month for a place to park, no sirens, no drunks, I can have a dog and a cat, maybe even a horse (big maybe). And the quiet mountain life.

I don't know the first thing about having a house built though.

I know I want to build down between Monument and Colorado Springs area. Possibly Woodland Park.

Found a lot in WP for $4500 with electric hookup. no water or gas. (not set in stone though).

I REFUSE to be part of an HOA...EVER! non-negotiable.

I don't need gas or propane though. I plan on using an electric heater for HVAC and electric water heater. My house will have central A/C and Heat. Not doing the swamp cooler thing or the wood stove. May have a fireplace added to the plan for the main level livingroom.

I plan on building this log cabin kit home.

http://www.naturallogcabins.com/Keplar-Home.html

however, I will have the plan modified so it can be set on a basement foundation. The basement will consist of a guest bedroom, tv room, game room for a pool table and air hockey table with a small wet bar (all to be added later on).


I have a V.A. Home Loan to use, so I don't have to worry about putting money down.

What I need to figure out is the water/sewage aspect of it, and how much its going to cost to dig and pour a basement and have a sump pump put in.

I don't know how wells work, or if my home loan would cover the cost of having one drilled? how much do they cost to have one drilled? How does a well work with getting water into the house for showers, water heater, kitchen sink, dishwasher, laundry, etc?

How does septic tank work and what frequently are the costs to empty it and maintain it? how frequently do they have to be repaired and/or replaced? How often do they have to be emptied?

Anyone know if my V.A. home loan will cover ALL of this? (with exception to the wetbar and game tables).

Will it cover appliances (washer/dryer, fridge, freezer, stove/oven)?

What about ensuring my lot is safe from mud or rock slides? Do I need to be concerned with earthquakes?

I know wildfires are always a concern. What kind of mitigation as a homeowner can I do and is expected of me? is there someone that can be hired to come out and assess all of these concerns/dangers?

i kinda doubt flood insurance would be needed in WP would it?

What kind of homeowners insurance should I be looking at and considering? deductibles, options, coverages, etc?


Cost of the house is: $81,xxx assembled
Plus delivery and mileage: $Unknown
Lot/Land: $Unknown
sewer/septic: $Unknown
excavating/basement: $Unknown
Electric hookup: $Unknown


Very confident I can keep everything under $175,000 which is the ceiling budget/most I want to spend. The big things to ensure that are the land and excavating/basement costs. Reason I want to build this is because I can't buy anything comparable for the price. $175,000 MIGHT get me a 700 sq ft A-Frame Cabin...if I am lucky.

if anyone sees anything I have missed, forgotten, might not know out or otherwise left out please chime in. All tips, suggestions and advice is welcome. If you have links that explain things those would be very helpful and appreciated. Even better if you save me money!

Don't plan to start till sometime in fall 2017 or spring 2018.

Once it's built and I get moved in, I'll be having a bbq/home warming party and I'll invite anyone that wants to come down.

Thanks in advance!
Sig Sauer P250 .40 S&W sub-compact
Trijicon night sights
(3) 10 round magazines.

Remington 870 12 ga. pump shotgun
Uncle Mike's Sling Mounts & Hooks | 15 shell sling | 56 shell bandolier | 25 shell belt | 4 chokes | Synthetic Black
10 shot Briley Extension Tube | Plano takedown hardcase

Custom Built AR-15
Surplus Arms & Ammo AR-15 Lower | 5.56 NATO or .223 compatible |
UTG 6 pt adjustable rear stock and buffer spring | Leapers UTG 3x12x44 SWAT Accushot - EZ Tap w/ illuminated reticle |
UTG Adjustable bi-pod | UTG ring scope mounts | Blackthorne 5.56 NATO Upper w/ 20" Bull Varmint Stainless Steel Barrel |
Magpul handguards w/ Delta Ring conventional gas tube setup (no piston) | Chrome Del-ton Bolt Carrier Group | DMPS Charging Handle |
DMPS Trigger | Magpul Trigger Guard | ProMag AR-15/M4 Heavy Duty Recoil Pad | 3 point SWAT Sling and sling hooks |
Nebo Tactical Flashlight and Laser Combo | 3 magpul picatinny rail mounts | Tactical Ergonomic Pistol Grip |
TMS Sling Swivel w/ Base | (20) - 30 round magazines |

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#2
Out of curiosity, why electric for heating and water? If my memory serves, those tend to be MUCH more costly than gas.
JackRock
Lakewood, CO
http://ryancash.co
Charter Member, Bristlecone Shooting Center
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#3
(03-17-2016, 10:10 AM)JackRock Wrote:  Out of curiosity, why electric for heating and water? If my memory serves, those tend to be MUCH more costly than gas.

I just dont care to hassle with it. I'm looking into solar for my electricity. exploring all options here.
Sig Sauer P250 .40 S&W sub-compact
Trijicon night sights
(3) 10 round magazines.

Remington 870 12 ga. pump shotgun
Uncle Mike's Sling Mounts & Hooks | 15 shell sling | 56 shell bandolier | 25 shell belt | 4 chokes | Synthetic Black
10 shot Briley Extension Tube | Plano takedown hardcase

Custom Built AR-15
Surplus Arms & Ammo AR-15 Lower | 5.56 NATO or .223 compatible |
UTG 6 pt adjustable rear stock and buffer spring | Leapers UTG 3x12x44 SWAT Accushot - EZ Tap w/ illuminated reticle |
UTG Adjustable bi-pod | UTG ring scope mounts | Blackthorne 5.56 NATO Upper w/ 20" Bull Varmint Stainless Steel Barrel |
Magpul handguards w/ Delta Ring conventional gas tube setup (no piston) | Chrome Del-ton Bolt Carrier Group | DMPS Charging Handle |
DMPS Trigger | Magpul Trigger Guard | ProMag AR-15/M4 Heavy Duty Recoil Pad | 3 point SWAT Sling and sling hooks |
Nebo Tactical Flashlight and Laser Combo | 3 magpul picatinny rail mounts | Tactical Ergonomic Pistol Grip |
TMS Sling Swivel w/ Base | (20) - 30 round magazines |

Draw
Reply
#4
If you are thinking solar...you have GOT to do everything energy efficient. And electric heat is a HUGE power user. How well are these log homes insulated? If they aren't well insulated, it's basically not going to work out without a huge system with a lot of batteries in it (since you'll need to heat at night and early in the morning).

The woodstove/fireplace will be helpful but you'll have to use it religiously. I know someone who built a very well insulated house and manages to heat it solely off his wood stove. I could probably do likewise (I built similarly to him) if I wanted to spend huge amounts of time managing a fire. As it is, I bought two propane tanks and only need to refill once a year (and basically one tank is still mostly full). Many of my neighbors fill once a month during the winter.
Known as SteveInCO on national fora (changed it here because "in Colorado" is the default).

CZ-75, Glock 20, Mossberg 590, S&W M&P AR-15, PTR-91, DSA FAL, Springfield M1A... and lots of other goodies.
Biggun
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#5
Ton of gray areas, way too many at this point so I hope you haven't purchased the land yet.

$4500 is a paltry sum for land in Colorado, such a low price typically means it's highly undesirable for an economic build, easily buildable land carrys a high price tag, land that is going to be extremely hard to build on or extremely expensive to build on IE - on the side of a mountain, not flat, is typically priced accordingly, so I hope somehow you've avoided a piece of land like that as all of your savings on the land price will be eaten away and then some in the extra build costs and I'd look for a more buildable piece of land ie (flat)

I'd march down to whomever the local building dept and zoning dept is for that area and start asking questions, you'll get a lot of answers to many of your questions for free, from the experts who eventually you will be dealing with anyways.

No earth quakes, rock slides - if you're worried about them I'm guessing this land is on the side of a mountain?

Wells- get expensive based on what they are drilling through and how deep, if you go up in elevation (side of a mountain) you have to drill all the way back down that elevation just to get back to where a piece of land is in the valley, and you're drilling through rock so get ready to pony up $50K-100K for just the well. Like I said, I don't know anything about the land other than the price, but typically land is priced based on it's ease of building on it. Cheap land isn't necessarily going to be a smart investment if it costs you 10x more to build on it, you need to look into that.

Septic systems are easy, unless you're on the side of a mountain, or your ground is rock, then forget it, you move away from a typical leach field/tank system to a tank only system, then it's just like crapping into storage tank. A typical leach field/tank system you might pump it out every 5 years. A holding tank system you might be pumping it out every 2 weeks, it depends on the size of the tank and how much use.

Basement - on flat land maybe $10K-$30K for excavation all depends on the size and the lot and all the site considerations, on the side of a mountain? Well how much dynamite can you carry up there for the rock blasting? Maybe $100,000?

Electrical hook ups, if the site has electrical you've got trenching and the electrical panel plus a city fee all of this could vary tremendously, however I'd assume if this is remote the city fees are not going to be excessive like in the city of denver, you might have $10K for everything, but just a guess.

Log homes look great, typically they aren't chosen for economy or convenience, you can stick build cheaper and modifications down the road are WAAAAY simpler/cheaper, everything in a log home equals more money, just keep that in mind, buy a log home for the looks and the lifestyle not to save money.
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#6
no I havent bought any land just yet. I'm in the asking questions/research phase.

all very good points you're all bringing up, this is what I was hoping for. thank you!
Sig Sauer P250 .40 S&W sub-compact
Trijicon night sights
(3) 10 round magazines.

Remington 870 12 ga. pump shotgun
Uncle Mike's Sling Mounts & Hooks | 15 shell sling | 56 shell bandolier | 25 shell belt | 4 chokes | Synthetic Black
10 shot Briley Extension Tube | Plano takedown hardcase

Custom Built AR-15
Surplus Arms & Ammo AR-15 Lower | 5.56 NATO or .223 compatible |
UTG 6 pt adjustable rear stock and buffer spring | Leapers UTG 3x12x44 SWAT Accushot - EZ Tap w/ illuminated reticle |
UTG Adjustable bi-pod | UTG ring scope mounts | Blackthorne 5.56 NATO Upper w/ 20" Bull Varmint Stainless Steel Barrel |
Magpul handguards w/ Delta Ring conventional gas tube setup (no piston) | Chrome Del-ton Bolt Carrier Group | DMPS Charging Handle |
DMPS Trigger | Magpul Trigger Guard | ProMag AR-15/M4 Heavy Duty Recoil Pad | 3 point SWAT Sling and sling hooks |
Nebo Tactical Flashlight and Laser Combo | 3 magpul picatinny rail mounts | Tactical Ergonomic Pistol Grip |
TMS Sling Swivel w/ Base | (20) - 30 round magazines |

Draw
Reply
#7
I didn't see anything on the wish list about a shooting range. As long as you're doing research, just as well look into it. Indoor and out.

I think going overboard on insulating would be worth it in the long run. Saving costs on heat and A/C is never a bad thing, no matter what method you chose. The best insulation is underground. Like a cave cut into the side of a mountain or just bury the place under 6 feet of dirt. I wouldn't want an underground house, but a modest house on top of a basement that is 3 times the size of the house could get my attention.

I would consider some kind of fireplace or wood stove for backup heating in case of a utility outage. The new stuff is low emissions and not subject to burn restrictions. Check out pellet stoves. They feed themselves as long as you have pellets in the hopper and power for the feeder. Also consider a backup generator. Big for whole house or a small one for the essentials.

And one real big thing, make sure the septic is downhill from the well.
ΜOΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

One of the greatest fears politicians have is seeing an angry guy with lots of guns charging down the street, because they know he’s probably on his way to commit an act of voting.

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#8
(03-18-2016, 01:14 PM)Highwayman Wrote:  I would consider some kind of fireplace or wood stove for backup heating in case of a utility outage. The new stuff is low emissions and not subject to burn restrictions. Check out pellet stoves. They feed themselves as long as you have pellets in the hopper and power for the feeder. Also consider a backup generator. Big for whole house or a small one for the essentials.

Contrary to Highwayman's impliication, do NOT get a pellet stove as a utility back up.  I know people who've done so then been utterly screwed when there was a two day power outage, which can happen with a blizzard.  No heat, because both their backup and their furnace would not run.  If you're rural, electricity is your only utility and it's therefore the only one that CAN go out (unless it's the end of the world as we know it, and propane trucks stop delivering).

A backup generator is a good thing to have, but unless you are willing to run it continuously through a multi day outage, it won't run your pellet stove.  It can be run intermittently to work the well pump.

One thing I did which is a bit unusual is to have my well fill a cistern, then use a jet pump to fill a pressure tank.  The well pump thanks me for not switching on and off every time I flush a toilet.  During an outage I only need electricity to refill the pressure tank periodically.
Known as SteveInCO on national fora (changed it here because "in Colorado" is the default).

CZ-75, Glock 20, Mossberg 590, S&W M&P AR-15, PTR-91, DSA FAL, Springfield M1A... and lots of other goodies.
Biggun
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#9
My brother in law is currently building his son a shipping container house on his property.
I am curious to see how it turns out.
The house itself is supposed to cost $60,000 to $70,000 , made from 6 containers.
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#10
(03-16-2016, 04:38 PM)HannahBearCo Wrote:  I have never owned or built my own home before. I did get the experience of watching my parents build their first home when I was 16, so I know a few things to watch for and look for and that I have to stay on top of things.

"On top of things" is a minimum of one full weekend a month when nothing needs to be repaired. Add to that any time necessary to maintain land, yard, foliage, etc.

(03-16-2016, 04:38 PM)HannahBearCo Wrote:  I know I want to build down between Monument and Colorado Springs area. Possibly Woodland Park.

Found a lot in WP for $4500 with electric hookup. no water or gas. (not set in stone though).

I REFUSE to be part of an HOA...EVER! non-negotiable.

That's a generally expensive area unless... Unless... You're on a dirt road that is 3rd or 10th down the list of things plowed after storms and/or the property has other serious problems.

I agree with the assessment that $4500 is an indicator of a serious problem that will be very expensive to fix.

Can't blame you on HOAs but realize that 99%+ of all land in Colorado has sold with restrictive covenants attached to the deed since the mid-80s. Your best bet is to find a piece of land with a *weak* HOA that has neither the money nor the willpower to make bunches of rules. Even better if they haven't been able to modify old by-laws that require a quorum and haven't been able to gather a quorum in decades. Talk to locals before buying.

(03-16-2016, 04:38 PM)HannahBearCo Wrote:  I don't need gas or propane though. I plan on using an electric heater for HVAC and electric water heater. My house will have central A/C and Heat. Not doing the swamp cooler thing or the wood stove. May have a fireplace added to the plan for the main level livingroom.

Electric in CO is hideously expensive compared to natural gas or propane for heating. Take a drive in the area before buying and count the propane tanks. There's a reason for that.

That said, we're on propane and it's not really any sort of "bother" or "problem". The local company I like will fill either leased tanks they lease cheaply, or owner's tanks. The tanks need to meet some minimum safety requirements so don't just buy up any old tank used and expect it to be approved by the county to hook to a house, nor that anyone will fill it. Stick to companies in the area that do this stuff all the time. They'll drop the tank in an appropriate place for truck access or recommend a place if you need some concrete footers and generally help you avoid any county permitting land mines.

(03-16-2016, 04:38 PM)HannahBearCo Wrote:  I plan on building this log cabin kit home.

http://www.naturallogcabins.com/Keplar-Home.html

however, I will have the plan modified so it can be set on a basement foundation. The basement will consist of a guest bedroom, tv room, game room for a pool table and air hockey table with a small wet bar (all to be added later on).

Basically what you're describing is our house in Elbert County on 4 acres in a subdivision and there's more out here, already built. You may want to do some shopping before building. Neighborhood is dirt roads, water is via individual on-property wells, electric is already here, and propane or wood for heating. Etc. Standard rural living.

(03-16-2016, 04:38 PM)HannahBearCo Wrote:  I have a V.A. Home Loan to use, so I don't have to worry about putting money down.

I will refrain from comment other than to say I think it's still smart to put a traditional amount down or close. It builds habits having to save it up, etc, that you'll need when owning.

(03-16-2016, 04:38 PM)HannahBearCo Wrote:  What I need to figure out is the water/sewage aspect of it, and how much its going to cost to dig and pour a basement and have a sump pump put in.

I've heard everything from $10,000 to over $20,000 to have a septic system REPAIRED out here, especially if a system fails and destroys the leach field. You need professional assistance with building a new one so its sized correctly for the expected size of the feeling and number of possible occupants, etc

Depending on the land, sump pumps aren't actually that common in Colorado for basements. There may be other ways to drain or the house may be above grade overall. The best way to keep water out of a basement here is that plus a good gutter and downspout system and protecting the area around he house from all precipitation possible like you're guarding a barrel of money -- and you are.

(03-16-2016, 04:38 PM)HannahBearCo Wrote:  I don't know how wells work, or if my home loan would cover the cost of having one drilled? how much do they cost to have one drilled? How does a well work with getting water into the house for showers, water heater, kitchen sink, dishwasher, laundry, etc?

Well is drilled - depending on depth and location, usually into one of two aquifers - Denver or Arapahoe. Denver is shallower and cheaper to drill to. Arapahoe is deeper and much more expensive to drill to. Any hole can also be a dry hole and a lot of money wasted too. My well is nearly 900' at he bottom and the pump is near the 680' level. Very expensive to drill that far and very expensive to put a pump down there. Or if a pump fails. At that depth, the installer chose to use a 240V pump for lower current and lighter gauge cable down the well (which comes from the house, where a pressure switch is located). This has implications for generator backup power obviously. A cheap 120V AC only genset won't do any good without a step up transformer that'll (essentially) double the current needed. (Advanced topic. I won't go deeply into it here but keep in mind when he power goes out, so does the well pump and the water.)

(03-16-2016, 04:38 PM)HannahBearCo Wrote:  How does septic tank work and what frequently are the costs to empty it and maintain it? how frequently do they have to be repaired and/or replaced? How often do they have to be emptied?

Big buried tank with at least two chambers where sewage flows in from he home. Bacterial decay occurs and most organic stuff decomposes then flows over to the second chamber trapping solids in the first and more decomposition and settling happens. Eventually what comes out of the tank on the far end is "water". That goes into a buried "leach field" that lets the water slowly soak back into a large chunk of land.

If the tank's solids aren't pumped out before its full, solid waste will exit the far end and enter the small-ish pipes of the leach field and plug them up and once water flows all the way through the field to the other side without leaching into the rocks and dirt bedding placed under this piping system, the field is considered "failed" and must be dug up and reinstalled. Many counties require enough land set aside for two fields and only one area used with the additional land available if a failure occurs.

(03-16-2016, 04:38 PM)HannahBearCo Wrote:  Anyone know if my V.A. home loan will cover ALL of this? (with exception to the wetbar and game tables).

Will it cover appliances (washer/dryer, fridge, freezer, stove/oven)?

No clue.

(03-16-2016, 04:38 PM)HannahBearCo Wrote:  What about ensuring my lot is safe from mud or rock slides? Do I need to be concerned with earthquakes?

I know wildfires are always a concern. What kind of mitigation as a homeowner can I do and is expected of me? is there someone that can be hired to come out and assess all of these concerns/dangers?

i kinda doubt flood insurance would be needed in WP would it?
Quote:The first two are likely somewhat covered under homeowners but the only way to know for sure is to work with a agent and ask. You may pay higher rates in some areas. Example: We have a volunteer fire district out here but the station is only two miles away. This keeps us unaffected by rate adjustments for real volunteer fire departments and response times. A piece of property in the middle of nowhere, you may not find wildland fire coverage at any price.

[quote='HannahBearCo' pid='23161' dateline='1458167911']
What kind of homeowners insurance should I be looking at and considering? deductibles, options, coverages, etc?

Much of it will be what they WILL and WONT cover not so much what you want. Any good agent or broker can explain options like "full replacement value" vs "depreciated value", etc. there are codes that mean certain bundled coverages which is how to compare apples to apples in price. If I recall they're things like "HO-4" and that means something to insurance professionals.

[quote='HannahBearCo' pid='23161' dateline='1458167911']
Cost of the house is: $81,xxx assembled
Plus delivery and mileage: $Unknown
Lot/Land: $Unknown
sewer/septic: $Unknown
excavating/basement: $Unknown
Electric hookup: $Unknown

It's a start.

(03-16-2016, 04:38 PM)HannahBearCo Wrote:  Very confident I can keep everything under $175,000 which is the ceiling budget/most I want to spend. The big things to ensure that are the land and excavating/basement costs. Reason I want to build this is because I can't buy anything comparable for the price. $175,000 MIGHT get me a 700 sq ft A-Frame Cabin...if I am lucky.

There's a reason for that. You also left off permitting costs, inspection costs, and probably paying a general contractor to oversee all the individual contractors unless you've got a lot of time on your hands.

(03-16-2016, 04:38 PM)HannahBearCo Wrote:  if anyone sees anything I have missed, forgotten, might not know out or otherwise left out please chime in. All tips, suggestions and advice is welcome. If you have links that explain things those would be very helpful and appreciated. Even better if you save me money!

Don't plan to start till sometime in fall 2017 or spring 2018.

Once it's built and I get moved in, I'll be having a bbq/home warming party and I'll invite anyone that wants to come down.

Thanks in advance!

Most counties are going to need engineering drawings of the entire project and multiple permits. The well needs a permit. The septic needs a permit. Electrical. You get the idea.

(03-17-2016, 10:10 AM)JackRock Wrote:  Out of curiosity, why electric for heating and water? If my memory serves, those tend to be MUCH more costly than gas.

Correct. Also look to see if you're in Xcel territory or IREA Co-OP. Very different beasts.

(03-17-2016, 04:16 PM)HannahBearCo Wrote:  I just dont care to hassle with it. I'm looking into solar for my electricity. exploring all options here.

Solar is very expensive and goes up fast for even handling a typical 200A residential "drop". Electric heat draws a LOT of current and is very inefficient. Solar won't hack it driving electric heat and hot water in winter even covering most of a larger piece of land.

(03-17-2016, 10:36 PM)308 Fan Wrote:  If you are thinking solar...you have GOT to do everything energy efficient. And electric heat is a HUGE power user. How well are these log homes insulated? If they aren't well insulated, it's basically not going to work out without a huge system with a lot of batteries in it (since you'll need to heat at night and early in the morning).

The woodstove/fireplace will be helpful but you'll have to use it religiously. I know someone who built a very well insulated house and manages to heat it solely off his wood stove. I could probably do likewise (I built similarly to him) if I wanted to spend huge amounts of time managing a fire. As it is, I bought two propane tanks and only need to refill once a year (and basically one tank is still mostly full). Many of my neighbors fill once a month during the winter.

Wood heating is a chore. But it's common out here as a backup to propane.

(03-18-2016, 07:56 AM)mfinley919 Wrote:  Ton of gray areas, way too many at this point so I hope you haven't purchased the land yet.

$4500 is a paltry sum for land in Colorado, such a low price typically means it's highly undesirable for an economic build, easily buildable land carrys a high price tag, land that is going to be extremely hard to build on or extremely expensive to build on IE - on the side of a mountain, not flat, is typically priced accordingly, so I hope somehow you've avoided a piece of land like that as all of your savings on the land price will be eaten away and then some in the extra build costs and I'd look for a more buildable piece of land ie (flat)

I'd march down to whomever the local building dept and zoning dept is for that area and start asking questions, you'll get a lot of answers to many of your questions for free, from the experts who eventually you will be dealing with anyways.

No earth quakes, rock slides - if you're worried about them I'm guessing this land is on the side of a mountain?

Wells- get expensive based on what they are drilling through and how deep, if you go up in elevation (side of a mountain) you have to drill all the way back down that elevation just to get back to where a piece of land is in the valley, and you're drilling through rock so get ready to pony up $50K-100K for just the well. Like I said, I don't know anything about the land other than the price, but typically land is priced based on it's ease of building on it. Cheap land isn't necessarily going to be a smart investment if it costs you 10x more to build on it, you need to look into that.

Septic systems are easy, unless you're on the side of a mountain, or your ground is rock, then forget it, you move away from a typical leach field/tank system to a tank only system, then it's just like crapping into storage tank. A typical leach field/tank system you might pump it out every 5 years. A holding tank system you might be pumping it out every 2 weeks, it depends on the size of the tank and how much use.

Basement - on flat land maybe $10K-$30K for excavation all depends on the size and the lot and all the site considerations, on the side of a mountain? Well how much dynamite can you carry up there for the rock blasting? Maybe $100,000?

Electrical hook ups, if the site has electrical you've got trenching and the electrical panel plus a city fee all of this could vary tremendously, however I'd assume if this is remote the city fees are not going to be excessive like in the city of denver, you might have $10K for everything, but just a guess.

Log homes look great, typically they aren't chosen for economy or convenience, you can stick build cheaper and modifications down the road are WAAAAY simpler/cheaper, everything in a log home equals more money, just keep that in mind, buy a log home for the looks and the lifestyle not to save money.

Covered it all pretty well.

(03-18-2016, 01:14 PM)Highwayman Wrote:  I didn't see anything on the wish list about a shooting range. As long as you're doing research, just as well look into it. Indoor and out.

I think going overboard on insulating would be worth it in the long run. Saving costs on heat and A/C is never a bad thing, no matter what method you chose. The best insulation is underground. Like a cave cut into the side of a mountain or just bury the place under 6 feet of dirt. I wouldn't want an underground house, but a modest house on top of a basement that is 3 times the size of the house could get my attention.

I would consider some kind of fireplace or wood stove for backup heating in case of a utility outage. The new stuff is low emissions and not subject to burn restrictions. Check out pellet stoves. They feed themselves as long as you have pellets in the hopper and power for the feeder. Also consider a backup generator. Big for whole house or a small one for the essentials.

And one real big thing, make sure the septic is downhill from the well.

Shooting in most rural CO counties requires more land than 1/2 acre. Elbert requires a minimum of 10 and the home must not be in a subdivision last I checked. In other words, "we don't want noise complaints from the neighbors nor you hitting one of them with a stray round". A true shooting range requires a permit and review.

(03-18-2016, 09:33 PM)308 Fan Wrote:  Contrary to Highwayman's impliication, do NOT get a pellet stove as a utility back up.  I know people who've done so then been utterly screwed when there was a two day power outage, which can happen with a blizzard.  No heat, because both their backup and their furnace would not run.  If you're rural, electricity is your only utility and it's therefore the only one that CAN go out (unless it's the end of the world as we know it, and propane trucks stop delivering).

A backup generator is a good thing to have, but unless you are willing to run it continuously through a multi day outage, it won't run your pellet stove.  It can be run intermittently to work the well pump.

One thing I did which is a bit unusual is to have my well fill a cistern, then use a jet pump to fill a pressure tank.  The well pump thanks me for not switching on and off every time I flush a toilet.  During an outage I only need electricity to refill the pressure tank periodically.

I have a pellet stove but I also have a very reliable inverter generator that will idle down under no pad to run it and a couple other "must have" appliances. I run extension cords to stuff. After three years out here and a few extended per outages - we will probably invest in a bigger auto transfer propane genset with its own tank and call it good eventually. Funace, well pump, some lights and a few outlets and we would be good to go.

I like your cistern thing but it's too late to put one where it would need to be. We have a pressure tank that keeps the cycling of he well pump to a minimum and a pump that rated for far more on off cycles per hour than we will ever need.

Have fun. I think that $4500 price on the property indicates something very wrong. Either right of way problems for the entrance road (you'll have to build that by the way and draininage for it is both critical and often another required by law permit and inspection), water access problems (deep well needed and not drilled), or no access to electrical (you pay to install telephone poles from the closest tap off point and any upgrades needed including transformers and the drop itself), or something.
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#11
(03-29-2016, 01:18 AM)DenverPilot Wrote:  I will refrain from comment other than to say I think it's still smart to put a traditional amount down or close. It builds habits having to save it up, etc, that you'll need when owning.

It's been over ten years since I got a mortgage, but the way it used to work was there was a 1% charge added to the payment to cover loan insurance. This paid the lender if you defaulted and went into foreclosure. Nothing to benefit you but you paid to benefit the lender. You could get out of this charge if your down payment was 20% or more. Also, anyone with an existing loan that has reached 20% equity should contact their lender and see if you can get out of the loan charge you are currently paying. If you really like buying insurance, I suggest a policy that pays you if you get injured and can't work so you can pay your bills.


One other thought about back up stuff. A truck driver can be gone for days at time. Unless you have someone to take care of your place for you, your back up stuff should be automatic. No one wants to come home to spoiled food and frozen pipes.
ΜOΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

One of the greatest fears politicians have is seeing an angry guy with lots of guns charging down the street, because they know he’s probably on his way to commit an act of voting.

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#12
Ahh yes. The PMI / Private Mortgage Insurance scam. You get to pay for PMI in most mortgages if your down payment isn't large enough until your equity reaches a certain amount and most lenders used to "forget" to take it off for a while. I say scam because it was even applied to government backed mortgages like VA and FHA, across the board. Law changes made it harder for places to "forget" to remove it but if you have to go low-down-payment pay attention and get rid of it ASAP. Essentially it's an additional charge on the cash-strapped and supposedly it covers the lender if you default. Of course that was generally proven wrong in the last crash (lenders kept foreclosed properties on their books and didn't make insurance claims against them because they were worth more to them as assets than liabilities which would have folded many of these banks, completely...)

Another scam is fees for maintaining escrow accounts for taxes, etc. Many lenders require tax escrow (smart on their part) be built up over the year to make sure the taxes on THEIR property (remember calling yourself a "homeowner" without a title deed in your pocket is essentially lying to yourself, you're a mortgage owner and the lender owns the property -- nice of you to do the upkeep on it for them for 30 years or whatever term you decide upon, isn't it? Grin...) The thing is, most people don't realize that "escrow" simply means "a separate bank account" and you can run your own escrow account -- but the industry sees this as somewhat "non-standard and probably will balk when you say "I want to handle my own escrow account, here is the bank and account number, what forms do you need me to fill out?" Often the fees run $50-$100 a year and who wants to waste money like that? Make your own account and write a check or transfer money every time you pay the mortgage for taxes and put it in there. Even better: Put the annual taxes in it up-front which shows the lender you are serious about it and already have it covered. Some lenders who are greedy won't let you do it, tell them to pound sand and find another lender or push it if you can manage your own affairs. It's utterly retarded to pay someone else to maintain a savings account for you.

Another good piece of advice that few heed... Hire a real estate attorney even for a single family standard home. They're relatively cheap, especially compared to the overall cost of a house or piece of land (well, barring $4500 pieces of land) and they can read through the three inches of legal documents that you'll be signing looking for non-standard non-boilerplate items or finding things that shouldn't be there. Why? Well... A friend just went through this:

- He signed a contract to have a new home built over a year ago.
- Builder saw the boom coming and decided with not enough workers to stop construction on his entire subdivision and send those workers to build high end houses in an up market. Supply and demand.
- None of the contracted people had read the paperwork. The builder had two years to complete their homes.
- When construction re-started, overworked and poor quality crews were found for this neighborhood. When I say they sent the craftmen to high end, let's just say this "low end" neighborhood was $600,000 homes. Seriously.
- Friend complains to builder management that various things are being built poorly. Example: You could stick a hand between the installed and completed outside wall siding panels with plenty of room to spare. Workers urinated in the unfinished house. Food wrappers and food remnants were found inside framed walls in the insulation. Wrong materials and colors were being put up against the original contract. Etc.
- Builder exercised a clause in the contract to cancel his order and hand him back his earnest money. Reason given: He didn't have an escort when he walked into the house to check on things and wasn't wearing a hard hat for safety.

He's waited a year and a half for his "dream home" and the builder knows they can sell it today for far more money than he contracted for. They popped themselves out of his contract and put the house back on the market to make a bigger profit.

He's talking to an attorney NOW but it's too late. Anything he does at this point he's negotiating from a standpoint of weakness and not strength because he can't withhold his business and signature to get them to build what he wants. An attorney up front could have warned him of the pitfalls of his particular contract and even requested to red-line or modify parts of it that he didn't like. Negotiation.

Signing that three inch stack of legalese, none of it designed to protect YOU from the builder or seller's mistakes, at closing, without having a professional look it over, is reckless at worst, overkill at best. All sorts of legal "outs" are written into real estate contracts and the seller and lender certainly had lawyers wrote their part -- best to fight fire with fire whenever purchasing.
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#13
well I guess my home of choice is not going to happen. Turns out that the cost is just for logs and assembling them. Doesn't include flooring, roof, windows, doors, carpet, wiring, plumbing, cabinets, etc.

Back to the drawing board.
Sig Sauer P250 .40 S&W sub-compact
Trijicon night sights
(3) 10 round magazines.

Remington 870 12 ga. pump shotgun
Uncle Mike's Sling Mounts & Hooks | 15 shell sling | 56 shell bandolier | 25 shell belt | 4 chokes | Synthetic Black
10 shot Briley Extension Tube | Plano takedown hardcase

Custom Built AR-15
Surplus Arms & Ammo AR-15 Lower | 5.56 NATO or .223 compatible |
UTG 6 pt adjustable rear stock and buffer spring | Leapers UTG 3x12x44 SWAT Accushot - EZ Tap w/ illuminated reticle |
UTG Adjustable bi-pod | UTG ring scope mounts | Blackthorne 5.56 NATO Upper w/ 20" Bull Varmint Stainless Steel Barrel |
Magpul handguards w/ Delta Ring conventional gas tube setup (no piston) | Chrome Del-ton Bolt Carrier Group | DMPS Charging Handle |
DMPS Trigger | Magpul Trigger Guard | ProMag AR-15/M4 Heavy Duty Recoil Pad | 3 point SWAT Sling and sling hooks |
Nebo Tactical Flashlight and Laser Combo | 3 magpul picatinny rail mounts | Tactical Ergonomic Pistol Grip |
TMS Sling Swivel w/ Base | (20) - 30 round magazines |

Draw
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#14
Don't give up. Like I said, log homes aren't built for economy, they are more expensive to build than a traditional house. If you want economical, modular homes are going to be the way to go, really nothing can touch them in price with the exception of building yourself and contributing all of the labor.
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#15
what is a modular home?
Sig Sauer P250 .40 S&W sub-compact
Trijicon night sights
(3) 10 round magazines.

Remington 870 12 ga. pump shotgun
Uncle Mike's Sling Mounts & Hooks | 15 shell sling | 56 shell bandolier | 25 shell belt | 4 chokes | Synthetic Black
10 shot Briley Extension Tube | Plano takedown hardcase

Custom Built AR-15
Surplus Arms & Ammo AR-15 Lower | 5.56 NATO or .223 compatible |
UTG 6 pt adjustable rear stock and buffer spring | Leapers UTG 3x12x44 SWAT Accushot - EZ Tap w/ illuminated reticle |
UTG Adjustable bi-pod | UTG ring scope mounts | Blackthorne 5.56 NATO Upper w/ 20" Bull Varmint Stainless Steel Barrel |
Magpul handguards w/ Delta Ring conventional gas tube setup (no piston) | Chrome Del-ton Bolt Carrier Group | DMPS Charging Handle |
DMPS Trigger | Magpul Trigger Guard | ProMag AR-15/M4 Heavy Duty Recoil Pad | 3 point SWAT Sling and sling hooks |
Nebo Tactical Flashlight and Laser Combo | 3 magpul picatinny rail mounts | Tactical Ergonomic Pistol Grip |
TMS Sling Swivel w/ Base | (20) - 30 round magazines |

Draw
Reply
#16
(04-21-2016, 10:55 PM)HannahBearCo Wrote:  what is a modular home?

Generally a home that is fully constructed in sections in one place, then delivered by truck (in pieces) to the ultimate location. Then they are assembled on site. They can be VERY well done, and the latest ones don't even look like they are modular (they used to be painfully obvious to any observer). 

Here's the wiki article on Modular Building.
JackRock
Lakewood, CO
http://ryancash.co
Charter Member, Bristlecone Shooting Center
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#17
There at least used to be an outfit here whose modular homes didn't look in the least bit modular.
Known as SteveInCO on national fora (changed it here because "in Colorado" is the default).

CZ-75, Glock 20, Mossberg 590, S&W M&P AR-15, PTR-91, DSA FAL, Springfield M1A... and lots of other goodies.
Biggun
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#18
I think I found my house. dont want it in LaSalle, but closer in towards Denver should work. probably east.

http://www.zillow.com/homedetails/2097764491_zpid
Sig Sauer P250 .40 S&W sub-compact
Trijicon night sights
(3) 10 round magazines.

Remington 870 12 ga. pump shotgun
Uncle Mike's Sling Mounts & Hooks | 15 shell sling | 56 shell bandolier | 25 shell belt | 4 chokes | Synthetic Black
10 shot Briley Extension Tube | Plano takedown hardcase

Custom Built AR-15
Surplus Arms & Ammo AR-15 Lower | 5.56 NATO or .223 compatible |
UTG 6 pt adjustable rear stock and buffer spring | Leapers UTG 3x12x44 SWAT Accushot - EZ Tap w/ illuminated reticle |
UTG Adjustable bi-pod | UTG ring scope mounts | Blackthorne 5.56 NATO Upper w/ 20" Bull Varmint Stainless Steel Barrel |
Magpul handguards w/ Delta Ring conventional gas tube setup (no piston) | Chrome Del-ton Bolt Carrier Group | DMPS Charging Handle |
DMPS Trigger | Magpul Trigger Guard | ProMag AR-15/M4 Heavy Duty Recoil Pad | 3 point SWAT Sling and sling hooks |
Nebo Tactical Flashlight and Laser Combo | 3 magpul picatinny rail mounts | Tactical Ergonomic Pistol Grip |
TMS Sling Swivel w/ Base | (20) - 30 round magazines |

Draw
Reply
#19
Looks nice.
A builder will put one of those anywhere you want it
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#20
(08-19-2016, 05:52 PM)bufordtjustice Wrote:  Looks nice.
A builder will put one of those anywhere you want it


well the builder refuses to build south of Johnston and refuses to sell me the plans so I can have someone else build it for me.

LaSalle is a 40 mile commute one way. dont really care to drive 80 miles a day to work and back.

so I'm back to the drawing board on a house.
Sig Sauer P250 .40 S&W sub-compact
Trijicon night sights
(3) 10 round magazines.

Remington 870 12 ga. pump shotgun
Uncle Mike's Sling Mounts & Hooks | 15 shell sling | 56 shell bandolier | 25 shell belt | 4 chokes | Synthetic Black
10 shot Briley Extension Tube | Plano takedown hardcase

Custom Built AR-15
Surplus Arms & Ammo AR-15 Lower | 5.56 NATO or .223 compatible |
UTG 6 pt adjustable rear stock and buffer spring | Leapers UTG 3x12x44 SWAT Accushot - EZ Tap w/ illuminated reticle |
UTG Adjustable bi-pod | UTG ring scope mounts | Blackthorne 5.56 NATO Upper w/ 20" Bull Varmint Stainless Steel Barrel |
Magpul handguards w/ Delta Ring conventional gas tube setup (no piston) | Chrome Del-ton Bolt Carrier Group | DMPS Charging Handle |
DMPS Trigger | Magpul Trigger Guard | ProMag AR-15/M4 Heavy Duty Recoil Pad | 3 point SWAT Sling and sling hooks |
Nebo Tactical Flashlight and Laser Combo | 3 magpul picatinny rail mounts | Tactical Ergonomic Pistol Grip |
TMS Sling Swivel w/ Base | (20) - 30 round magazines |

Draw
Reply




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