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Ammo issue
#1
Hey everyone,

I recently bought 1000 reloads of 45 acp 230 grain and I went out shooting today and it was failing to eject the round. It would sometimes push the slide back just enough to where the empty case would push up and look the gun up. Think an almost stove pipe where the round was still facing down range. Sometime it would cycle but only enough to move the slide with the round failing to eject. When I looked in my chamber and the casing there was lots of unburnt powder and the casings had a big dark "smoke" mark. Could this be because of wet or bad powder or is it more like a loose crimp? This happened to my fnx 45 and a custom 1911 officer model. The gun ran fine with some other loads I had so I'm confident in the firearm. I dont know if somehow with the temperature being around freezing if that could affect the burning of the powder.  Blahblah
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#2
Could be a number of things causing it.

This why I don't buy reloaded ammunition. You never know what your hoping to get.

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#3
The fact that there was left over powder in chamber and casing lead to believe that's the cause. However the big black mark on the casing kinda makes me think it could be the loose crimp. Never had an issue with reloaded ammo til now.
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#4
Wrong powder, wrong primers, loaded too light.

Temperature can play a part if non magnum primers are used with too slow burning powder.

Usually mag primers are not needed for the powders used in 45 acp.

Only the person that reloaded the ammo knows for sure.
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#5
Not a fan of reloads much here anymore either.

- Dad passed away and left some in 9mm 115 gr FMJ that at first look seemed "okay". Shooting some with my wife one day at the range, she has a couple of FTFs and racks them out and is about to continue when both the range safety guy and I both say "whoa" almost simultaneously. One of them she racked out was bulged so badly it looked like it had never been through the resizing die. We start pawing through the ammo can and we find tons of these. What we realized later was that dad had probably also noticed they sucked and started sorting them into two different ammo cans and we were shooting his "bad" can. We had shot an entire ammo can of "good" so we never gave it a second thought. Could have been very very bad. We disposed of what was left and called it "done". No more of dad's leftovers.

- Bought some reman from a lesser known reman brand (I'll just say not Freedom nor LAXAmmo, I've heard nothing but good about both and I don't want to slam remanufacturers here...) and as I was shooting those I was looking them over carefully while loading them. I notice one with a weird crimp and look closer and see the bullet itself is completely misshapen. I dig through that box and find two more.

I'm currently using up a little bit of that brand in both 9mm and .45 ACP but I give each and every round the hairy eyeball. Once it's gone, it won't be coming back ever again.

Obviously even with factory new ammo, one should at least pay attention for screwy things, but my record of finding bad things on reman/reloads is orders of magnitude higher than factory new.

Of course if you're detail oriented enough, the way to fix the problem "forever" is to load your own. I haven't gotten around to it yet, but I do collect my brass generally.

Target ammo factory new is just not that expensive compared to the hospital visit for a kaboom, I figure. That bulged round at least wouldn't even chamber properly. The misshapen bullet could have easily become a squib.

Not my cup of tea to worry about poorly reloaded ammo anymore. Pretty well over it.

May someday do Freedom or LAX, but even then, I would spend some quality time looking over the rounds before putting them in the "good to go" container(s).
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#6
Just to clarify, are we talking about reloads done by an individual, or re-manufactured ammo done by a company, such as HSM (I only mention HSM because it's the only name that comes to mind).

O2
When seconds count, the police are mere minutes away...
They'll never take your "hunting rifle", they'll call it a "sniper rifle" first.
Gun registration is gun confiscation in slow motion.
Zero failures comes at infinite cost.
You are the FIRST responder. Police, fire and medical are SECOND responders.
By eliminating fear of guns you'll put fear back in criminals.
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#7
These were done by a company. I'm gonna call them today and see what they say.
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#8
(01-11-2016, 09:51 AM)Espi0909 Wrote: These were done by a company. I'm gonna call them today and see what they say.

Yhea, right thing to do. This is why you buy from a company rather than "Frank" at the gunshow who has some reloads.

O2
When seconds count, the police are mere minutes away...
They'll never take your "hunting rifle", they'll call it a "sniper rifle" first.
Gun registration is gun confiscation in slow motion.
Zero failures comes at infinite cost.
You are the FIRST responder. Police, fire and medical are SECOND responders.
By eliminating fear of guns you'll put fear back in criminals.
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#9
Just a quick update:
Go in contact with the website and found out that the ammo comes from one of their vendors. I told them of the problem and the guy I spoke with was understanding and said to send him a email explaining the problem and he said the he soul speak with the manufactor. Called him a day after I sent the email and he said they would exchange the ammo and will be mailing 1000 new rounds with a ups label for the other ammo to be sent back.
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#10
I'd be sweating bullets (no pun intended) while firing those 1,000 rounds because the problem could have just as well been on the other side of the pressure curve... :(

Care to share the manufacturers name? Because personally I'd avoid them.

O2
When seconds count, the police are mere minutes away...
They'll never take your "hunting rifle", they'll call it a "sniper rifle" first.
Gun registration is gun confiscation in slow motion.
Zero failures comes at infinite cost.
You are the FIRST responder. Police, fire and medical are SECOND responders.
By eliminating fear of guns you'll put fear back in criminals.
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#11
The 2 reasons I started reloading.

1- I can't afford large quantities of factory ammo.

2 -I don't like shooting other people's reloads.

It's not cheap to get into reloading but, it pays for it's self pretty quick if you shoot much.
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#12
The manufacturer was leadhead. I wanna see what they day about the rounds when I ship then back. If I had a garage or shop I would get into reloading but I don't have the space not until I graduate and get a job.
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#13
Quick update so finally the new 45 ammo is suppose to show up tonight but, it look like only 500 rounds so I will need to contact then again. It did take this long to get the ammo sent out and I have had to place many calls to ammo clearance to figure things out. We will see if this batch is any better
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