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Can a public school bar a person from visiting based on that persons religion?
#1
Question 
This is the situation as I understand it.

A town along Eastern I-70 has told a youth pastor that he can no longer come to the school to eat lunch with students. This youth pastor has been coming to the school for quite some time to spend time with students that attend his church and any other students that wish to eat with him. Apparently one student complained and the school told the pastor that can no longer come to the school. When students spoke with the principal they were told that the pastor being at the school violated separation of church and state.

Now I know the stated reason for barring him is invalid. My question is, is there something that allows a school to bar an individual because of their religion or job title? To my knowledge the school has not banned all persons from visiting students during lunch, only this pastor.

Thoughts and opinions??
Where can you carry? Check the editable COGO Carry Map
When in doubt. JFC.

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#2
Beau, I'm sure I'm not the only one who will have this thought come to mind. A pastor repeatedly coming to a school to hang out with the children? My danger flag goes up. It's a shame, but it does. There's just been too much of a history with it.

As a ski racing coach, I have to have routine and periodic background screenings done, looking for any history of child molestation. It sucks, but it's the world we live in. Several years back I even had a coach on my staff who got busted for it. Man, we just aren't afforded the luxury of being blind to or naive about it anymore.
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#3
(10-25-2012, 09:50 PM)FastMan Wrote: Beau, I'm sure I'm not the only one who will have this thought come to mind. A pastor repeatedly coming to a school to hang out with the children? My danger flag goes up. It's a shame, but it does. There's just been too much of a history with it.

As a ski racing coach, I have to have routine and periodic background screenings done, looking for any history of child molestation. It sucks, but it's the world we live in. Several years back I even had a coach on my staff who got busted for it. Man, we just aren't afforded the luxury of being blind to or naive about it anymore.

You may not be the only one to think that but it sure isn't something that crossed my mind. It seems pretty normal to me for a youth pastor to be involved in the daily lives of those they have been given charge over. Especially by visiting them in a public forum like school. Public schools are filled with anti-God sentiment and is a place where the influence of the word of God is greatly needed.
Where can you carry? Check the editable COGO Carry Map
When in doubt. JFC.

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#4
(10-25-2012, 10:22 PM)Beau Wrote: You may not be the only one to think that but it sure isn't something that crossed my mind. It seems pretty normal to me for a youth pastor to be involved in the daily lives of those they have been given charge over. Especially by visiting them in a public forum like school. Public schools are filled with anti-God sentiment and is a place where the influence of the word of God is greatly needed.

Yeah, perhaps I'm jaded.

I'm with you on the anti-God sentiment in the schools, Beau. It's over the top everywhere, and by that I mean beyond just the schools. I think the slipping of moral integrity in society today is clear indication a little more religious influence is sorely needed. Our make believe Christian President, and his obsessive lying, is a prime example.

I grew up in a time when moral/legal indiscretion like watergate resulted in the removal of a President. Now much worse barely invokes a yawn. Used to be a man's word was his bond. My Grandfather ran his logging business on a handshake. Now you need 6 lawyers to make sure the contract is sound, and then you're still not safe from some scum bag trying to rip you off. Right and wrong gets measured by the side with the deepest pockets and strongest legal team.

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#5
Agree with you on the "church and state" being bogus Beau.
But really not enough information to make a call.
Makes me think there is more to the story than, a kid complained and he was barred for no other reason than he was a pastor.
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#6
(10-26-2012, 09:07 AM)bufordtjustice Wrote: Agree with you on the "church and state" being bogus Beau.
But really not enough information to make a call.
Makes me think there is more to the story than, a kid complained and he was barred for no other reason than he was a pastor.

I'm trying to get more information but that is how it was laid out to me. I think a phone call to the principal on Monday is in order. Hopefully I can get better details.
Where can you carry? Check the editable COGO Carry Map
When in doubt. JFC.

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#7
We had a youth pastor like that as well. No problems and one of my friends was the pastors daughter so not sure if they could bar a father from seeing his daughter
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#8
Well I'm having trouble finding out more details. The person who posted deleted it and is being tight lipped about it now. She wasn't prepared for the hornets nest that got kicked and doesn't want to make trouble.
Where can you carry? Check the editable COGO Carry Map
When in doubt. JFC.

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#9
If it was the truth , and the whole truth , she shouldn't have a problem telling it.
Makes me think even more that something stinks.
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#10
Our schools were always considered "closed campus" where guests were not invited without checking in/out at the front office. Not in the ghetto, there wasn't a fence or metal detectors or even a security team, that was just the policy.
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#11
While I don't think him being a pastor should be relivent, and I don't know from the info given whether it is or not, I have a problem with anyone going to the school to visit the children without the school checking them and their intentions. Also should be some parental input as well. Unfortunately, in this day and age, it is a necessity.
That said, I would have no problem with a legitimate pastor visiting my child, assuming I knew about it, and was able to contact said pastor with any questions, etc.
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#12
Any more info on this situation ?
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#13
While I don't have a problem with a youth pastor visiting with (willing) kids in general, I don't think a school is the place for it. I didn't send my children to school to learn religion (or liberal indoctrination for that matter) and would perceive it a distraction from what I expect the institution to deliver. I respect everyone's right to believe as they choose but a tax payer funded education facility is not the place.
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#14
(11-07-2012, 04:55 PM)Whistler Wrote: While I don't have a problem with a youth pastor visiting with (willing) kids in general, I don't think a school is the place for it. I didn't send my children to school to learn religion (or liberal indoctrination for that matter) and would perceive it a distraction from what I expect the institution to deliver. I respect everyone's right to believe as they choose but a tax payer funded education facility is not the place.

The school was teaching nothing not endorsing anything. He was visiting during the lunch break to visit with students that wanted to.
Where can you carry? Check the editable COGO Carry Map
When in doubt. JFC.

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#15
I think if you want to have your child visited by a pastor, you should enroll them in a religious based school. I also agree that having someone spend that much time at an elementary school, should be of some concern. If they are going to be there, they should be checked out. If I found out it was happening at my kids' school, I would be unhappy. On a side note, I don't think morality stems from religion. It stems from ones upbringing. It can be both genetic and cultural. For millennia, man has killed and persecuted in the name of religion. I think an open mind is best.
One shot, One kill
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#16
I bet you have some parent volunteers who visit the school and spend an hour a week in the classroom. The fact that he is a pastor gets some people all riled up. Nobody was forcing kids to sit down and talk to him (like a school psychologist).

I'm more worried about some of the stupid crap I hear teachers saying/pushing/admitting.
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#17
The problem with the whole concept of "separation of church and state" is that it has led to this perception that there can be "NO GOD" involved with anything publicly funded.

The principle of separation church and state is that the government shall not force a specific religion on its constituents. If the pastor wants to come in to connect with the youth, I don't personally have a problem with it, but to those ends, invitations should be extended to other denominations: Christian, Jewish, and yes, Muslim faiths should all be respected equally. That is the founding principle of our nation: there shall be no establishment of A religion.

Yet our entire foundation has theology peppered throughout it. Just from my short term memory (which is already failing at this hour), in culling what I can recall from the Declaration of Independence, The Constitution, The Federalist Papers, Oaths of Office, and even our currency, here's a sampling:
  • God has bestowed on humans certain inalienable rights.
  • One Nation, Under God
  • In God We Trust
  • So Help Me God.
Jason Anderson
NRA Instructor
Firearms enthusiast
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#18
"Under God" was added to the Pledge of Allegiance first in 1948.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pledge_of_Allegiance#Addition_of_.22under_God.22
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#19
Urf, can I blame my aging mind? LOL

At least it's there - right? :-)
Jason Anderson
NRA Instructor
Firearms enthusiast
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#20
(02-24-2013, 09:55 PM)DGCJason Wrote: The problem with the whole concept of "separation of church and state" is that it has led to this perception that there can be "NO GOD" involved with anything publicly funded.

The principle of separation church and state is that the government shall not force a specific religion on its constituents. If the pastor wants to come in to connect with the youth, I don't personally have a problem with it, but to those ends, invitations should be extended to other denominations: Christian, Jewish, and yes, Muslim faiths should all be respected equally. That is the founding principle of our nation: there shall be no establishment of A religion.

Yet our entire foundation has theology peppered throughout it. Just from my short term memory (which is already failing at this hour), in culling what I can recall from the Declaration of Independence, The Constitution, The Federalist Papers, Oaths of Office, and even our currency, here's a sampling:
  • God has bestowed on humans certain inalienable rights.
  • One Nation, Under God
  • In God We Trust
  • So Help Me God.

But which God were they talking about?
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